Friday, August 28, 2015

Oregon Army National Guard units complete battle simulations at U.S. Army National Training Center

An Oregon Army National Guard Soldier with 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, drives away from an enemy smoke screen at dawn during the first day of simulated combat operations at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif., Aug. 22. (Photo by Spc. Michael Germundson, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)
More than 500 Soldiers of the Oregon Army National Guard’s 3rd Battalion, 116th Calvary Regiment (3-116th Combined Arms), and the 1186th Military Police Company (1186th MP), spent 12 days conducting live-fire exercises and large-scale simulated battle scenarios at the National Training Center (NTC), in the Mojave Desert at Fort Irwin, Calif., August 14-25, 2015.

The Oregon units augmented the Idaho Army National Guard’s 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) during the first Decisive Action operation, known as “force-on-force,” integrated combat and maneuver training cycle the Army National Guard has completed since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. More than 5,200 Service Members from 10 states’ National Guard units, as well as U.S. Army Reserve and active duty U.S. Army components, participated in the training.

Staff Sgt. Rodriguez, with 3rd Platoon, A Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment; 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team, receives a situation report prior to an enemy helicopter attack during a battle simulation exercise at the National Training Center (NTC), Fort Irwin, Calif., Aug. 22. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

“The purpose of this NTC rotation is to allow the brigade to advance its collective training skillsets and our proficiencies as a brigade combat team,” said Idaho Army National Guard Col. Russell Johnson, commander of the 116th CBCT. “We rarely, if ever, get the opportunity to take all 4,000-plus Soldiers out and train together at one time. The National Training Center is one of those rare resources in today’s Army that allows us the opportunity to do that.”

The training was designed to simulate an expeditionary deployment experience and increase war-fighting capabilities. The 116th CBCT used Abrams tanks, Bradley Fighting Vehicles, and Apache helicopters provided by the Idaho Army National Guard’s 1st Battalion, 183rd Attack Reconnaissance (1-183rd ARB), to conduct simulated battles against the U.S. Army’s 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR).

The Director of the Army National Guard, Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy, said that NTC training ensures combat units in the National Guard achieve the readiness levels required by the Army in order to meet the nation’s demands.

“The National Guard is part of the total Army force and we have combat formations within our team ... so it’s important that we give these organizations the opportunity to come out and go against world-class OPFOR [opposing forces] to grow and train,” said Kadavy.

An M1A2 Abrams tank crew from D Company, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT), Oregon Army National Guard, fires the 120mm main gun during a company live fire exercise, Aug. 16, at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Oregon’s 3-116th Battalion successfully conducted three running battles and retained the ability to continue projecting effective combat power during the training. The battalion defeated more than double its weight in opposing force combat troops, armor and equipment.

“It was an extremely challenging environment and a very difficult standard and the Soldiers did exceptionally well,” said Oregon Army National Guard Lt. Col. Brian Dean, commander of the 3-116th Battalion.

The 3-116th Battalion consists of Citizen-Soldiers from seven Eastern Oregon cities and was the first National Guard battalion in the nation certified on the new M2A3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) and the Abrams M1A2 SEPv2 main battle tank. The battalion spent four years training on the new equipment and preparing for NTC.

“This marks the end of a lot of sacrifice for Soldiers, families and employers,” said Dean. “I want to thank the families. I understand that it is sacrifice for them. And to the employers, without them being willing to give up their hard working Soldiers, we wouldn’t be able to do this.”

Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Bloker participates in a safety brief with troops in 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT), Oregon Army National Guard, prior relocating their tactical base of operations during combat training at the National Training Center (NTC), Fort Irwin, Calif., Aug. 17. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

The 1186th MP Company is based in Salem, Oregon, with a detachment in Milton-Freewater. The military police Soldiers contributed to the training as a combat service and support unit.

“The troops have been great. It’s been absolutely fantastic. High morale under very austere conditions and they’ve risen to every challenge and I’m fantastically proud of each and every one of them,” said Oregon Army National Guard Master Sgt. James Webb, with the 1186 MP Company, 821st Troop Command Battalion.

Oregon Army National Guardsman Pfc.Treyse Reber, M240 gunner with the 1186th Military Police Company, provides security for his squad as they contemplate a route for their mission at the National Training Center (NTC), Fort Irwin, Calif., Aug. 23, during the second day of the force-on-force simulated battle between 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) and the Opposing Force (OPFOR), 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR). (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 115th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)


Monday, August 17, 2015

SFC (Ret.) Richard Floyd Moore Mar 10, 1966 – Aug 7, 2015


The Oregon Army National Guard is deeply saddened by the passing of Sergeant First Class (Ret.) Richard Floyd Moore.

He passed away August 7, 2015 in Salem, Oregon, at the age of 49. He was born March 10, 1966 in Salem, Oregon, to Sandra Cook and John Moore.  He graduated from South Salem High School.

After Rick graduated from high school in 1984, he immediately joined the U.S. Marine Corps. It was here that Rick served on the U.S.S. Ranger as s security detail member, and was later stationed at Camp Pendleton, California in 1988. Rick was honorably discharged from the U.S. Marines.

During Rick’s enlistment, he met, fell in love with, and married Lori Slusser in 1987. Shortly after their marriage they started raising a family and had two children, Kylie and Dylan Moore. Though Rick was now a “civilian” and he had many opportunities for work, his heart called him back to serving his country through military service.

He joined the Oregon Army National Guard in 1992. It was there that Rick excelled and made many life-long friends. Rick served in the Infantry as a unit clerk, human resource specialist, and in the Recruiting and Retention Battalion. Rick was also a volunteer in the Oregon Army Funeral Honors Guard and enjoyed his military career until he retired in August of 2009.

Aside from being a husband, service man, and father, Rick enjoyed hunting, fishing, golfing, and traveling. Rick also ensured he was at family functions and attended his children’s sporting events. You would also, almost always see Rick working the BBQ during summer or just about any time of the year making sure his family and friends were taken care of, having a good time, and enjoying some great food.

He leaves behind his wife Lori Slusser Moore, daughter Kylie Moore, son Dylan Moore, parents Sandra Cook and John Moore, sisters Terry Shipley, Kathy Kiselicka and Sean Doobian, and brothers Jim Moore, Michael Moore, and Steven Moore plus many nieces and nephews.

Burial Services will be held at Willamette National Cemetery, located at 11800 SE Mount Scott Blvd., Portland, OR 97086, on August 18, 2015, at 10:30 a.m.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Many Oregon National Guard members are now returning from deployments throughout the world, with several other units heading out the door, even this week! One concern many returning Soldiers and Airmen have is jobs.

Author and military fitness guru Pauline Nordin came up with several tips for entrepreneurs, which may be helpful to those who are contemplating starting a business. These are also helpful to those looking for employment, or a job upgrade, or simply for self improvement, and we thought we'd pass them along...

1. Have a personality. Don't find one, don't try to make up one, BE one from the bottom of your soul and just display it.

2. Offer something there's a need for, not something you wish there was a need for.

3. Avoid looking for stardom overnight. Do what you are passionate about, then have long patience and it will pay off.

4. Do NOT do what everyone else does. If you do your USP drops to anonymous and averagely interesting.

5. Be prepared to get 1,000 NO thanks and be prepared to DO it YOUR way without any help.

For more information on Pauline's career advice, visit her Facebook page at: www.Facebook.com/FDfighterdiet or follow her on Twitter at @fighter_diet


Speaking of career opportunities and jobs, Hero to Hired, ESGR, Worksource Oregon and the Oregon National Guard are putting on a Career and Education Fair, June 26, at Camp Withycombe.  The address is: 5530 SE Minuteman Way Clackamas, OR 97015. You can find an event listing on our Facebook page, here.

Employment Workshop: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m

Career and Education fair: 1 – 4 p.m

For more information, contact Jason Phelan at 503)280-6041 or Pete Pringle at 503)669-7112 Ext 264

Pre-register for the event here.

Some of the highlights for employment and education available to service members include:

EMPLOYMENT

Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs Jobs Page: Includes military skills translator, resume assistance, job postings, etc.

WorkSource Oregon - Veteran Services Page: Local assistance in communities around utilizing Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPS). Can assist with resumes, job placement, interview skills, etc.

Oregon.Gov Employment Page: List of POCs across Oregon (both LVERs and DVOPs)

Military One Source: Resume assistance/job preparation for federal and civilian jobs

My Next Move: Assist Service Members in finding careers that correlate with their military skill set or totally unrelated career field they are interested in (has interest profiler for those who are undecided).

Veterans Administration:  Assists Service members with career assessment based upon their previous education and future goals

Helmets to Hard Hats: Information specifically on building and construction careers for Service Members

Goodwill Industries: Goodwill Industries can assist with resumes, interviewing, job placement, application help

EDUCATION

Veterans Administration Education & GI Bill: Education information, GI Bill comparison tool, choosing schools, etc.

Veterans Administration Careerscope: Assists Service members with career assessment based upon their previous education and future goals

Military One Source K-12 scholarship & college info: Scholarship and financial assistance information for children/spouses of Service Member (includes FAFSA/Pell Grant info.


Posted by Nick Choy,
Oregon Military Department Social Media Manager

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Oregon Army National Guard medevac unit trains with Canadian Armed Forces


The Aurora Borealis “Northern Lights” color the night sky, May 13, behind an Oregon Army National Guard HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter from Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation, at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, in Denwood, Alberta, Canada. The Oregon Guard medevac unit is providing air support to the Canadian Armed Forces during Maple Resolve 2015. (Photo by Sgt. Arthur Maldonado, Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation)

Story by Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs

CANADIAN FORCES BASE WAINWRIGHT, Alberta, Canada – The Oregon Army National Guard’s aeromedical evacuation unit, Charlie Company, 7-158th Aviation (C-7/158 AVN), traveled to Canada, April 29-May 20, to participate in the Maple Resolve 2015 training exercise at Canadian Forces Base Wainwright in Denwood, Alberta.
Maple Resolve is the Canadian Armed Forces’ annual, joint force training exercise and is the culminating collective training event to validate the Canadian Army’s High Readiness task forces. This year’s exercise was comprised of approximately 5,200 Canadian Army soldiers, 700 Royal Canadian Air Force members, 700 U.S. Army and Marine Corps troops, and 150 British Army soldiers.
The Canadian Maneuver Training Centre (CMTC) requested a Forward Support Medical Team (FSMT) to provide medical evacuation (medevac) operations in support of Maple Resolve this year. The Oregon Army National Guard provided three HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters and 26 personnel to support both medevac training, as well as real medical emergency evacuations during the exercise.

Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Michael Buchan (right), a flight medic with Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation, escorts members of the Canadian Armed Forces transporting a patient away from an HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter during Exercise Maple Resolve at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, May 7, in Denwood, Alberta. The Oregon Army National Guard medevac unit is providing support during the Canadian Armed Forces' largest annual exercise. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)
The FSMT, also known as a “Dustoff” team, consisted of 12 flight crewmembers and 14 additional support personnel to include operations, maintenance crews, an additional flight crew, as well as two weather technicians from the Oregon Air National Guard.
“The team has worked tirelessly to establish a working rapport with the Canadian forces,” said Chief Warrant Officer-2 Jeremy Andrews, an aeromedical evacuation pilot with C-7/158 AVN. “We’re establishing the procedures for how both real world and exercise medevac assets would be used.”
The Oregon Army Guard aviators logged more than 120 flight hours during the exercise, conducting 17 medevac training missions and multiple training flights for the exercise. They provided air support for simulated mass casualty situations, which tested the Canadian Armed Forces’ response time to field injuries and medevac procedures. The FSMT also conducted nine real-world emergency medical evacuations for injured personnel during the training exercise.

A Canadian Army medic with 5 Field Ambulance Valcartier, Quebec, treats a simulated patient in a mass casualty training exercise during Exercise Maple Resolve 2015 at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, May 5, in Denwood, Alberta. The simulated mass casualty exercise tested the Canadian Armed Forces’ response time to field injuries and medevac procedures with aeromedical evacuation support from the Oregon Army National Guard’s Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)
Upon arrival in Camp Wainwright, four Canadian flight medics were assigned to the FSMT. The Canadian medics integrated with the Oregon Guard team, participating in both real world and exercise medevac missions throughout the duration of the exercise.
“It was a great learning experience,” said Canadian Army Cpl. Sean Gauthier, a medical technician with 5 Field Ambulance, Valcartier, Quebec. “It was very beneficial to see the difference in the medical protocols, and answered a lot of my questions on how to process a medical evacuation.”

Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Sarah Wickenhagen (center), an aviation medicine Nurse Practitioner with Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation, and Master Cpl. Stefan Morissette, a medic with 5 Field Ambulance Valcartier, Quebec, oversee an IV procedure given by Cpl. Sean Gauthier, a medic with 5 Field Ambulance, Valcartier, Quebec, during Exercise Maple Resolve at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, May 2, in Denwood, Alberta. Exercise Maple Resolve is the Canadian Armed Forces’ largest annual exercise and involves more than 6,500 military personnel from Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)
In between medevac missions, the FSMT conducted aircraft inspections, maintenance and gave mission briefings to visiting dignitaries, including a visit from U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman. The team also taught Medevac 101 classes to members of the Canadian Armed Forces.
“Maple Resolve was an outstanding success for the medevac unit,” said Lt. Col. Mark Ulvin, State Army Aviation Officer for the Oregon Army National Guard. “The exercise allowed Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers to interact with our international partners by introducing the critical lifesaving mission of the medevac HH-60M helicopter capabilities and their vital importance to the battlefield.”


Oregon Army National Guard Sgt. Michael Buchan (center), a flight medic with Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation, explains medevac procedures for the HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter to members of the Canadian Armed Forces during Exercise Maple Resolve 2015 at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, May 11, in Denwood, Alberta. The Oregon Army National Guard medevac unit is providing support during the Canadian Armed Forces' largest annual exercise. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Nathan Edgecomb, commander of C-7/158 AVN, said the chance to work with allied partner forces in a combined exercise helped to develop a solid working relationship and delivered invaluable training to all personnel involved.
“It afforded us an opportunity to train for a real-world deployment in a way that cannot be duplicated during a home-station annual training,” said Edgecomb. “Working with the Canadian forces was an incredible opportunity to hone our skills in both relationship and coalition building, as well as in our technical ability to provide the best medevac coverage possible.”
Oregon Soldiers in the FSMT said Exercise Maple Resolve enabled them to train 24-hours a day on mastering their skills in battlefield medicine and medical evacuation; skills they must perform instinctively on a moment’s notice when lives are on the line.
“Being a medic is not for everyone, but these people see us on their worst days,” said Oregon Army National Guard Maj. Sarah Wickenhagen, an aviation medicine nurse practitioner with 2-641st Aviation who served as the flight surgeon for the FSMT during Maple Resolve. “I work with incredible people who would all give their lives in the service of another. There is nothing better than that.”
That’s impression she hopes the Oregon Guard’s medevac unit made on the Canadian Armed Forces during Exercise Maple Resolve 2015.
Wickenhagen said she is proud to be part of a team that embodies the “Dustoff” legacy and remains true to the C-7/158 AVN unit motto to selflessly do whatever it takes “so that others may live.”
Oregon Army National Guardsmen with Charlie Company, 7-158 Aviation practice dust landings with a HH-60M Blackhawk helicopter during Exercise Maple Resolve at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, May 3, in Denwood, Alberta. The Oregon Army National Guard medevac unit is providing support during the Canadian Armed Forces’ largest annual exercise, involving more than 6,500 military personnel. (Photo by Sgt. Erin J. Quirke, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)